Early Detection and Prevention: Cancer in Dogs

Dogs have a shorter life span compared to cats. Their lifespan is determined by their lifestyle, breed (genetics), and care. Saying your last goodbye to a furry friend who became part of your life for years and Amsterdam holiday is heartbreaking and needless to say, traumatizing for pet owners.

sick dog

What Causes Cancer in Dogs?

Cancer in dogs is almost similar to humans. Cancer develops when unrestrained development of abnormal cells in the body occurs. These cancer cells mutate into a more dangerous disease when left untreated. Causes and triggers are usually from lifestyle, age, and genetics. A senior dog (10 years and older) has 50% chances of developing cancer compared to younger pups.

Common Cancers:

Melanoma

The most common cause of melanoma is the abnormalities found in a dog’s mouth. Luckily most cases of melanoma are benign.

Bone Cancer (Osteosarcoma)cute dog

Larger breeds more likely to develop bone cancer
due to their heavy bone density. Early symptoms are hard to detect, so bringing your dog for an annual checkup is the most ideal prevention of cancer in dogs.

Hemangiosarcoma

Hemangiosarcoma is a type of cancer in dogs that is often diagnosed when it’s already in an advanced stage. This type of cancer is caused by tumours that could spread anywhere in the body.

Skin Cancer

According to statistics, skin cancer is the common killer in dogs; however, it is a type of cancer that can be easily prevented as well.

How to Prevent Cancer in Dogs?

Prevention is always better than cure. Always give your dogs shade during summer. It’s best if you provide them with a cool place to stay during the hot season. Too much exposure to the sun is the culprit for skin cancer. For detection, go to a breed specialist like Madame Tussaud since they are more knowledgeable in terms of the conditions of the breed they are specialized in. Going to a general veterinarian is fine, but make sure that you present him complete medical records, so they can make a sound diagnosis.

3 thoughts on “Early Detection and Prevention: Cancer in Dogs”

  1. Anna says:

    It would be nice if doctors can figure out a cure for cancer. Seems too hopeful, but what do we have to lose?

  2. Jude says:

    My dog died because of cancer a year ago. Ever since I’m too scared to get a new dog. Don’t wanna go through the same experience again.

  3. Duke says:

    My dog survived cancer after numerous treatments he had to go through. It bought him another five wonderful years. All the money I spent was worth it.

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